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Magdalena Frackowiak Jewelry

Made exclusively in Poland by the finest jewelers, Magdalena's jewelry celebrates the sensuality and elegance of women. Crafted by hand using traditional techniques such as lost wax casting, each piece is a one-of-a-kind creation bearing an artisan’s singular markings. From creation to completion, her collection reflects her personal commitment to bring you artistry and joy.

Alexander Terekhov

Alexander Terekhov one of the most successful fashion brands in Russia. In 1999, still a student of the Moscow Institute of Fashion and Design Alexander Terekhov ranks second place in the contest "Russian Silhouette". Having graduated from the Moscow Institute of Fashion & Design, Terekhov immediately sets off to Paris for his training with legendary Fashion House Yves Saint Laurent. The brand Alexander Terekhov women's clothing has been known since 2004, and from 2006 to 2009 is the only Russian participant in The New York Fashion Week.

Maison Ravn

Passionate about fabrics, their incredible histories, and the beauty of their temporal imperfections, the Norwegian designer has always gathered extraordinary fabrics from collectors all over the world. With these treasures, she has created a unique range of Maison Ravn bags. Each bag combines the most precious fabrics with the rarest skins and leathers, often painted by hand.

David Koma

David Koma is a georgian born, London based fashion designer who has become synonymous with the ultra body contouring silhouette. creating sculptural statement dresses inspired by the feminine form, it is this design element that has projected the young designer onto the international stage.

Jack Vartanian

Since 1999, Jack Vartanian has created fine jewelry collections infused with a unique blend of tradition, sophistication and avant-garde design. Vartanian's passion for precious stones comes from his family long standing tradition in the gemstone trade. The Vartanian family business provided an early exposure and practical training for the designer. Jack began working in the jewelry industry as a teenager, developing his design skills at an early age.

Hadid Eyewear

A tight knit family that is synonymous with style, sunglasses have always been a staple at Hadid family outings. While each family member has its' own eclectic taste, there has always been an underlying understanding that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Naturally, the idea became clear and Hadid eyewear, a family brand, was born. Combining classic style with modern fashion and functionality, Hadid eyewear blends the individual style of each family member with beautifully crafted frames made from the highest quality materials.

Alexandre Vauthier

Soon after his graduation, Alexandre Vauthier joined the design studio of Thierry Mugler, who supported him and taught him thoroughness of the construction of the garment. Later he joined Jean-Paul Gaultier as head designer of the couture collection and eventually launched his own brand in 2009. His natural need of preciseness and rigor and his radical cuts is expressed through a style inspired by his french culture and his anglo-saxon influences.

Francesco Scognamiglio

Francesco Scognamiglio has slowly but surely built a name for himself. Born in Pompeii in 1975, Scognamiglio is now based in Milan, where he consistently blends a background and knowledge in classically beautiful tailoring with high-fashion contemporary design. It is always a strong, unforgettable mix that ensures each piece will remain a wardrobe staple for years to come.

Racine Carrée

Racine Carrée (“square root”) is the abstraction of the double “V” that represents the name of the Neapolitan designer Viviana Vignola. Having grown up amongst the smell of the finest leathers and the most exclusive materials in the family tannery, Viviana left her career in law to follow her instinct to create shoes that merge the highest quality with the most sophisticated techniques.

Redemption

Made in Italy Ready to Wear Fashion Brand, and designer and producer of one of a kind hand made choppers. We donate half of our net profits to carefully selected charitable foundations. Be a messenger of the Redemption, and wear your causes!

Ruslan Baginsky





Silou

Designed in London and constructed in Lithuania using non-toxic materials, each garment empowers and enhances through the points of the Silou triangle; Balance, Movement and Style. Silou’s mindful manufacturing forms pieces that do so much more than artistically enhance the female silhouette. They speak for ethical values. A commitment to making well thought out decisions along a well walked path.

Coming soon..

Wear Your Boots Properly

By Hasher Marouf

Posted in , , | Tags : , , ,

1. The Chelsea Boot (aka Dealer Boots)

A boot with an ankle-high height, a close fit and without laces. this boots employ an elastic panel known as goring, which allows the shoe to stretch when taking it on or off. Known and praised for its convenience.

How to wear them: Today, more refined varieties with dress shoe soles are making a comeback. We think it’s proof positive that suits and boots can live in perfect harmony — provided, of course, that the cut complements the Chelsea’s slim, sleek lines. Your shirt collar, tie and, yes, even your briefcase should have an equally trim proportion to the slimness of the boot. We recommend pairing your navy suit with brown Chelsea boots.

2. The Chukka Boot (aka Turf Boots Or Bucks)

Like the Chelsea, the chukka boot is also known for hovering in the ankle area. But the similarities stop there. This boot comes with two to three eyelets of lacing and is often outfitted in suede. In the 1940s, chukkas popped up as part of a trend toward casual dressing, and by 1950, the British brand Clarks had invented its iconic desert boots (essentially a chukka with a crepe rubber sole), solidifying the style’s spot in shoe history.

How to wear them: A recent resurgence in popularity has everyone from college kids to soccer dads sporting chukkas. And for good reason: It only takes a solid Oxford shirt and straight-leg jeans with a single cuff that gently covers the boot without breaking (so the pants fall straight over the shoe in a clean line) to do these shoes justice.

3. The Cowboy Boot (aka Western Boots)

They’re exactly as you imagine: A tall boot shaft at least above the middle of the calf, no laces and a heel of about two inches. tips: you don’t have to lasso livestock to own a pair.

How to wear them: For city folk, we suggest a more modern take in broken-in brown or tan with a rubber sole. And unless you can actually wrangle something, couple your cowboy kicks with jeans (preferably a dark and slim boot cut), an Oxford shirt and a tweed sportcoat.

4. The Hiking Boot

Hiking boots vary widely in appearance, but the key to sniffing out this shoe is a relatively rigid structure that provides support for the ankle without restricting movement. despite its name Hiking boots have been evolved into a all-purpose outdoor recreation shoes.

How to wear them: Fortunately, there are now more refined kinds that retain the function and feel of the original without the need for a fleece and a flashlight. Our take is best worn with rolled corduroys (a single cuff will do) and a shawl collar cardigan or fitted sweater in Fair Isle.

5. The Motorcycle Boot (aka Engineer Boots)

The height ranges from above the ankle to below the knee, but all motorcycle boots boast a low heel in order to aid in putting the pedal to the metal, as well as heavy duty leather for protection against an unplanned meeting with the pavement. Engineer boots are the archetypal old-school biking boot (as opposed to the tricked-out racing or motocross kinds)

How to wear them: These days, you can flaunt a pair with all the elements of a true engineer boot without coming off like a costume. Toss them on in your downtime with a pair of black jeans, a relaxed-fit pocket tee and, of course, a leather jacket.

6. The Military Boot (aka Combat Boots)

As you might expect, boots made for the military are designed with one goal in mind: to shield you from an unfriendly environment. As a result, combat boots run the gamut from ankle-high to under-the-knee, and are typically made from technical materials like waterproof leather, Gore-Tex and rubber.

How to wear them: Swapping traditional black boots for red ones and donning dark denim (complete with a couple of cuffs or tucked directly into the boot), a vintage tee and a tailored peacoat should keep you clear of counterculture territory.

7. The Winter Boot (aka Cold-weather Boots)

This is perhaps the broadest boot group of boots, with styles from military-issue Kevlar lace-ups to suede and shearling-lined slip-ons. What they have in common? They all fit the foot snugly to help retain heat. Born from the simple need for survival, waterproof winter boots made of deer skin and tree bark with bearskin soles are at least 53 centuries old. And while structure and style have thankfully changed, the basic premise of protection against winter’s woes remains the same. No one north of Florida should be without a sturdy pair past December.

How to wear them: We’re currently occupied with technical takes that combine leather uppers with reinforced rubber on the toe. Trust us — they’re nothing short of genius for when snow turns to slush. The combination of materials also allows you to comfortably keep them on throughout the day with jeans, a thermal Henley and fitted puffer coat.

 

In short, you don’t need to be a cowboy or a military officer to buy into men’s boots. Turns out, even if you’re on desk duty, there’s still a way to slip ’em on with style.

About The Hasher Marouf

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